CTM provides innovative educational opportunities to study traditional medicine, natural medicine and complementary and alternative medicine including seminars, accredited MA and PHD-level studies, field work and internships in the US and Mexico.
The word Culture is derived from the root words ‘cult’ (worship) and ‘ure’ (earth), meaning worship of the earth. This course explores the ways peoples of the earth heal and worship through the use of plants and foods. We will explore the history and scope of ethnobotany, ethnopharmacology, and ethnomycology, examining the practices of peoples and their relationships to the plant world for health, healing, and ecstatic ritual. We will examine the impact of research, ecotravel and international organizations, including current controversies such as resource rights of indigenous peoples. Each student has the opportunity to focus on a particular cultural focus.
Where there is a culture there is a cuisine. Since the beginning of globalization in the 15th century foods found in the deep reaches of jungles, deserts, forests, oceans, and ice caves have in some instances become daily food for millions of peoples when originally they were discovered and consumed by peoples who long lived in a location. What is the history behind some of these Fourth World Foods and how does the natural version differ from the commercialized version? The health of the world’s peoples will depend on the success or failure of a growing “food sovereignty” movement and a wider understanding of nature’s living
food basket.
The word “therapist” is derived from the Greek word therapeutae referring to people who worship and serve. As an act of service and compassion, working with traumatized individuals and groups is spiritually rewarding. However, listening to horrifying experiences, witnessing pain, attending to chronic stress and anger, shouldering suicidality, and responding to the compelling needs of traumatized individuals inevitably precipitates sequelae common to trauma itself: Autonomic hyper-arousal, numbness, somatic complaints, disillusion, overwork, and other addictive behaviors

TM290 Integrative Traumatology
3 Credit Seminar
The word “therapist” is derived from the Greek word therapeutae referring to people who worship and serve. As an act of service and compassion, working with traumatized individuals and groups is spiritually rewarding. However, listening to horrifying experiences, witnessing pain, attending to chronic stress and anger, shouldering suicidality, and responding to the compelling needs of traumatized individuals inevitably precipitates sequelae common to trauma itself: Autonomic hyper-arousal, numbness, somatic complaints, disillusion, overwork, and other addictive behaviors.